Hallucinogens

  • acid
  • blotter
  • cid
  • cubes
  • liberty caps
  • liberties
  • lsd
  • magic mushrooms
  • mushrooms
  • microdot
  • sacred mushrooms
  • shrooms
  • tabs
  • trips
  • zen
Are hallucinogens a problem for you?
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What are hallucinogens?

Hallucinogens are a group of drugs that work on the brain to affect the senses and cause hallucinations – seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting or touching things that do not exist. Hallucinogens are sometimes called psychedelic drugs, trips, magic mushrooms, LSD or acid.

New psychoactive or synthetic substances can also have a hallucinogenic effect, such as NBOMe, see Synthetic Drugs Effects and FAQs for further detail.

Download the hallucinogens fact sheet.

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Hallucinogens
Hallucinogens

Lysergic acid diethylamide

(C20G25N3O)

Some hallucinogens occur naturally in trees, vines, seeds, fungi (eg psilocybin or magic mushrooms) and leaves. Others are made in laboratories by mixing different chemical substances (trips, LSD, acid). Some drugs, such as cannabis and ecstasy, can cause hallucinogen-like effects when used in high doses or in certain ways. Using hallucinogens is often called tripping.

Physical effects can include

  • muscles twitching
  • feeling numb
  • feeling sick or vomiting
  • poor coordination

Effects depend on...

​What hallucinogens do to you depends on how much you take, your height and weight, your general health, your mood, your past experiences with hallucinogens, whether you use hallucinogens on their own or with other drugs, whether you use alone or with others, at home or at a party, etc.  

  • feeling weak
  • pupils get bigger
  • shaking
  • heart beats faster

How hallucinogens affects your body

Tap a body part to learn more of the effects hallucinogens places on your body.

Psychological effects can include

  • seeing, hearing, touching or smelling things in a distorted way, or that don't exist
  • mixing of the senses (eg you hear colours or see sounds)
  • changed and intense thoughts
  • intense sensory experiences
  • space becomes distorted
  • emotional swings

General information

Are hallucinogens a problem for you?


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  • The Alcohol & Drug Information Service (ADIS) is a free and confidential counselling helpline for NSW residents with concerns around alcohol and/or drug misuse and is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. ADIS is staffed by professional counsellors who provide education, information, counselling, support and referrals to other appropriate services in NSW.

    Are you worried you could be drinking too much or consuming drugs in a way that has become a problem? Are you worried about your friends or family finding out and want to get help quickly and quietly? Are you worried about the drug use of someone close to you – maybe a family member or friend? Maybe you just want to know where someone can get help? 

    ADIS clinicians understand the difficulties of speaking out, seeking help and finding appropriate drug and alcohol treatment, and use their knowledge and experience to assist you and answer questions, such as:

    • How can I cut-down or stop my alcohol or drug use?
    • What help can I get?
    • Do I have to wait long to get help?
    • Can anyone ring ADIS?
    • Who do I talk to when I ring ADIS?
    • Will drug and alcohol treatments be difficult?
    • What is this drug doing to me?
    • What are the short and long term problems that could develop if I continue using?
    • Will ADIS tell anyone that I rang?
    • What can I expect when I ring?
    • Does ADIS record calls?

    You can call ADIS 24 hours a day, 7 days a week on 1800 250 015 or for Sydney Metropolitan 02 8382 1000 or alternatively you can start a Web Chat.

    ADIS Web Chat is available from Monday to Friday 8.30am – 5pm (including public holidays).

    ADIS also has a range of telephone lines offering specialised drug and alcohol information and support to particular groups.

    24 hour support line

    1800 250 015

    More about Alcohol and Drug Information Service (ADIS) NSW
  • ​​The Alcohol & Drug Information Service (ADIS) Web Chat is a live online conversation with a professional counsellor. The service is free, confidential and open to anyone affected by alcohol and other drugs, including people concerned about their own use, or about a family member or friend. Web chat is only available for people living in NSW.

    The service is provided by ADIS at St Vincent's Hospital, in partnership with the NSW Ministry of Health.

    What to expect

    • A counsellor will chat with you about your alcohol or other drug concerns
    • A counsellor can provide a referral or contact information for relevant alcohol and drug services in NSW
    • Our chat is confidential unless you disclose any intention to harm yourself or others.
    • WebChat is provided in English however if you prefer to speak in a language other than English we would be happy to arrange a telephone call with you through the Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS National). Please call the Alcohol and Drug Information Service on 1800 250 015 to arrange this.

    Emergency Assistance

    Call Emergency Services on 000 if you:

    • require urgent medical attention or
    • are in immediate danger or
    • are at risk of harming yourself or someone else.

    Monday to Friday 8.30am – 5pm (including public holidays)

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  • Your Service Hub is an online directory of alcohol and other drugs support, health and welfare services. If you need support for your own or someone else's substance use, you should use terms in Find Services like:

    • drug and alcohol family support

    • drug and alcohol Aboriginal services 

    • drug counselling

    • drug and alcohol rehabilitation

    • drug and alcohol residential treatment

    Use your suburb name to narrow the search to services near you.

    Not sure what service you need? Call the Alcohol and Drug Information Service on 1800 250 015.

    More about Your Service Hub
  • PeerLine is confidential service run by the NSW Users and AIDS Association (NUAA). NUAA works to improve the health, welfare and dignity of people who use drugs. 

    PeerLine is a free, confidential peer supported telephone service for people who use drugs, who are on the Opioid Treatment Program or seeking treatment. Trained peers will help you with information, advice and advocacy

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    PeerLine is available from 9.00am to 5.00pm Monday to Friday (excluding public holidays).

    Call for free on 1800 644 413 or email peerline@nuaa.org.au to connect.

    Monday to Friday 9am – 5pm

    1800 644 413

    More about NUAA PeerLine
Your Room > A-Z of Drugs > Hallucinogens